Ohio House bill allows women to get more free breast cancer screenings

Via Peters

More Ohio women will soon have access to free additional breast cancer screenings, thanks to a few Cincinnati-area advocates and state representatives. The legislation is known as House Bill (HB) 317, and it will require insurance companies to cover additional screenings for individuals who are a high risk for breast cancer or have dense breast tissue. The bill was recently passed in the Ohio general assembly and should soon cross the desk of Gov. Mike DeWine for signing.“The passage of HB 371 means every Ohio woman will have the right to have early detection of breast cancer, and it will be the beginning of the end of breast cancer as a fatal illness,” said Michele Young, HB 317 advocate and breast cancer survivor. “Early detection means a 99% chance of a cure. In my case, it was 1%. We have just changed the odds for every woman in Ohio. We are just beginning. University of Cincinnati eradicated polio. Today, we will do the same for breast cancer,” she continued. The bill is supported by a team of doctors at UC Health. “House Bill 371 is only the start,” Young said.Advocates said the heart of the bill is removing health barriers based on those who could and couldn’t afford to pay out of pocket for additional health screenings.The bill also expands the current definition of mammography to allow access to additional, more accurate screenings, such as 3D mammography known as tomosynthesis or magnetic resonance imaging. Women with dense breasts, who are at higher risk for the disease, will be informed of the increased risk and the potential need for advanced screening, advocates said. “The Breast Cancer Bill is truly an economical, effective and lifesaving piece of bi-partisan legislation that will help all women in Ohio,” said Rep. Jean Schmidt, who was an original co-sponsor of the bill. Under the new state law, physicians can determine patient eligibility for additional screening.“Up to 75% of the women who receive a breast cancer diagnosis have no family history. Through more detailed screening tools such as tomosynthesis, studies have shown cancer detection rates to increase by about 40%. It’s essential in our work and to all patients that they are educated on the risks and have access to these tools,” UC Health breast radiologist and assistant professor at the UC College of Medicine, Dr. Ann Brown stated. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, early detection improves a patient’s survival rate and the cost-effectiveness of treatments.

More Ohio women will soon have access to free additional breast cancer screenings, thanks to a few Cincinnati-area advocates and state representatives.

The legislation is known as House Bill (HB) 317, and it will require insurance companies to cover additional screenings for individuals who are a high risk for breast cancer or have dense breast tissue.

The bill was recently passed in the Ohio general assembly and should soon cross the desk of Gov. Mike DeWine for signing.

“The passage of HB 371 means every Ohio woman will have the right to have early detection of breast cancer, and it will be the beginning of the end of breast cancer as a fatal illness,” said Michele Young, HB 317 advocate and breast cancer survivor.

“Early detection means a 99% chance of a cure. In my case, it was 1%. We have just changed the odds for every woman in Ohio. We are just beginning. University of Cincinnati eradicated polio. Today, we will do the same for breast cancer,” she continued.

The bill is supported by a team of doctors at UC Health.

“House Bill 371 is only the start,” Young said.

Advocates said the heart of the bill is removing health barriers based on those who could and couldn’t afford to pay out of pocket for additional health screenings.

The bill also expands the current definition of mammography to allow access to additional, more accurate screenings, such as 3D mammography known as tomosynthesis or magnetic resonance imaging.

Women with dense breasts, who are at higher risk for the disease, will be informed of the increased risk and the potential need for advanced screening, advocates said.

“The Breast Cancer Bill is truly an economical, effective and lifesaving piece of bi-partisan legislation that will help all women in Ohio,” said Rep. Jean Schmidt, who was an original co-sponsor of the bill.

Under the new state law, physicians can determine patient eligibility for additional screening.

“Up to 75% of the women who receive a breast cancer diagnosis have no family history. Through more detailed screening tools such as tomosynthesis, studies have shown cancer detection rates to increase by about 40%. It’s essential in our work and to all patients that they are educated on the risks and have access to these tools,” UC Health breast radiologist and assistant professor at the UC College of Medicine, Dr. Ann Brown stated.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, early detection improves a patient’s survival rate and the cost-effectiveness of treatments.

https://www.wlwt.com/article/ohio-breast-cancer-bill-passes-general-assembly/40256990

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